Indian Bean Farming

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Indian Bean Farming

Name of PlantIndian Bean
Botanical NameLablab purpureus-Indian Bean
Other SppDolichos lablab L.

Dolichos purpureus L.

Lablab niger Medikus

Lablab lablab (L.) Lyons

Lablab vulgaris (L.) Savi

FamilyFabaceae
OriginIndia
OrderFabales
GenusLablab
KingdomPlantae
Indian Local NameVaal/Valol/Bitter Valol etc
Major Growing States in IndiaTamil Nadu., Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra, Gujarat etc

Indian Bean Farming

  • Indian bean is known as Bitter Bean, Valol, and Papdi etc. in India.
  • Val is mainly grown as a semi-rabi and Rabi crop.
  • Karnataka, Kerala, Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat and Orissa are the major Indian bean growing states.
  • Indian bean is classified into two types based on the use of its seeds and pods. The use of Indian bean for seed and pods as vegetables is known as val-papadi.
  • For seed bean is grown in kharif season or after paddy harvesting as non-irrigated crops in stored moisture.
  • Indian bean contains about 22 to 30% protein in it.
  • The thick fibrous pods are specially used for making Indian Recipe “UBALIYU” while the dry seeds are used as pulses/dal.
  • The dried seeds are soaked in water overnight then remove the outer coating, the processed bean is used for making dal.
  • Indian Bean is leguminous crops that increase the nitrogen content of the soil by fixing nitrogen from the air in the soil.
  • Its root soot penetrates deep into the root layer and breaks through the hard layers of the soil.
  • Decaying leaves of plants adds organic matter to the soil.
  • Apart from this, Indian bean is also used as animal feed.
  • As the UMBADIYA made from green bean is very tasty, the demand for Indian bean among the people is increasing and the cultivation is becoming very profitable economically.
  • Thus, now a days, Indian bean cultivation is becoming prevalent in the India.

Indian Bean Farming

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Different varieties of Indian bean

Hebbal Avare-1Pusa Early

Prolific

C.O -1C.O -5
Arka VijayPusa Sem 2C.O -2C.O -6
Arka JayPusa Sem 3C.O -3C.O -7
Hebbal Avare-3Wal Konkan 1C.O -4C.O -8
Hebbal Avare-4C.O -9C.O -10C.O -11
C.O -12C.O -13RajaniKDB 403
KDB 405DasarawaDeepaliwalJDL. 79
JDL. 53Gujarat Bean-1Gujarat Bean-2Kashi Harittima

Soil and Climate for Indian bean

  • Indian bean crops are particularly grown in heavy to medium black soils.
  • Indian Bean sowing is done in the semi-winter season after harvesting of short-term kharif cereal crops or paddy.
  • Rainy and cloudy weather is not suitable for this crop.
  • This crop needs clear sky and low temperature for flowering and seed setting.

Indian Bean Farming

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Land Preparation for Indian bean

  • This crop can be taken as irrigated or non-irrigated crop.
  • No special soil preparation is required for non-irrigated Indian bean crops.
  • After harvesting the monsoon crops i.e. paddy etc, the land is prepared for sowing by plowing with a plow or tractor.
  • If  grown as an irrigated crop, then after plowing with a plough-tractor, level the land, prepare nursery bed and sown the crop.

Seed rate for Indian bean

  • 60 kg of seeds are  per hectare, if you want to sow Indian Beans as a single crop.
  •  25 kg of seeds per hectare, if you want to take it with mixed crops like Castor, Mustard, jute, and chickpea etc.

Seed treatment for Indian bean

  • After the first coat of fungicide (Thyram or Bavistin 1.5 to 2.0 gm per kg seed) before sowing, 30 gm (each having 10 x 00000000 live cells per gm) of rhizobium culture and phosphate solubilizing bacterial culture (P.B.N-2) treatment is recommended.

Sowing Time and Spacing for Indian bean

  • Sowing of Indian bean should be done especially in late October or the first week of November.
  • Sowing at a distance of 60 cm. X 30 cm or 60 cm X 15 cm, so that the number of plants per hectare is sufficiently maintained.

Indian Bean Farming

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Fertilizer for Indian bean

  • 20 kg Nitrogen and 40 kg Phosphorus per hectare is recommended for Indian bean crop (Based on Research at Various Agriculture University).
  • In addition, 20 kg Sulfur per hectare is also recommended.
  • All the required chemical fertilizers should be applied in the furrows at the time of sowing, so that all these nutrients are available to the crop timely and easily, which can be utilized by the plants for growth and development.

Irrigation for Indian bean

Indian bean is commonly grown as a non-irrigated crop. But when it is to be planted as an irrigated crop, there is a need to give three to four irrigations as follows.

  • Immediately after first irrigated sowing (for good growth)
  • Second irrigation 40 to 45 days after sowing
  • Third irrigation at the time of flowering i.e. 70 to 75 days after sowing
  • Fourth irrigation at the time of pod setting i.e. 95 to 100 days after sowing. Irrigate only as the crop gets moisture and do not allow it to fill with water.

Indian Bean Farming

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Inter culturing and weed management for Indian bean

  • Keeping the Indian bean crop free from weeds during the initial 30-35 days period gives higher production. This requires inter culturing and weed control timely.
  • 2 to 3 inter culturing is to be carried out to remove weeds between the rows.
  • In case there is labor shortage, use recommended weedicides for control of  weeds.

Crop Protection Measures for Indian bean

Aphid, Jassid and pod borer are the main pests causing damage in this crop.

(a) Pest Control System:

  • Bird perches/arrangement in the field so that the birds can sit and eat moths thereby control of insect-pest.
  • Setting up sex pheromone traps by bringing suitable lure to the crop to capture male caterpillars. By doing this, caterpillars can be effectively controlled.
  • Spray N.P.V at 450 larval equivalents per hectare especially in the evening.
  • Always keep  border of the farm neat and clean.
  • Neem-based insecticides or neem kernel solution of 5% mix with 10 liters of water and spray on affected crops as and when needed.
  • Spray Bacillus thuringiensis 1 kg per hectare.

Indian Bean Farming

(b) Disease Control System:

  • Always select healthy seed  free from disease.
  • Select wilt-resistant varieties. Early uprooting and destruction of yellow vein mosaic diseased plants and control of vector insects by spraying with sucking pest insecticides on time.
  • Spray Pseudomonas 10 ml per litre.
  • Trichoderma mixed with Farm yard manure and applied to the soil.

Indian Bean Farming

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Harvesting of Indian bean

  • When the pods begin to dry and turn yellow, pick the plant, dry it in a yard and hand-pick it to remove the seeds.
  • Clean and grade the grains and fill them in sterile bags or bins.
  • Mix dried neem leaves with seeds for long time preservation of seeds.

Yield/Production of Indian bean

  • Non-irrigated crop -700 to 800 kg per hectare
  • Irrigated crop1500 kg per hectare

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Value addition in Indian Bean

  • Use Green Indian Beans as Ubadiya can give double price.
  • Green beans are soaked in hot water for 4 hours and the husks are removed to make dal, which is dried in the shade, packed and sold in the market for double the price.
  • Making dal from dry grains and selling it in the market fetches good prices.

Consider the following points to increase Indian bean production

  • Sow only recommended improved varieties (As recommended by Agriculture University).
  • Timely sowing of Indian bean after paddy harvest.
  • Use of suitable fungicide and rhizobium culture layer before sowing the seeds.
  • Maintain sufficient number of plants per hectare (Use recommended spacing of crop).
  • Keep crops free from yellow vein mosaic and blight by timely intercropping.
  • Timely crop protection measures.
  • Irrigate the crop as and when required.
  • Harvest the crop on time.
  • Store in a proper and organized place for long run.

Indian Bean Farming

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Summary:

Indian bean, also known as Bitter Bean, Valol, and Papdi, is a leguminous crop that increases soil nitrogen content by fixing nitrogen from the air. It is primarily grown in major Indian bean growing states like Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Gujarat, and Orissa. Indian bean contains 22-30% protein and is used for making Ubadiyu, a traditional Indian recipe, and dal. It can be grown as a single crop or mixed with mixed crops like Castor, Mustard, jute, and chickpea. Land preparation is simple, and the crop can be sown in late October or November. Recommended dose of Fertilizers , and inter-culturing and weed management are essential for maintaining growth and development.

Indian bean is a non-irrigated crop that requires three to four irrigations after planting. Inter-culturing and weed management are crucial for higher production. Pest control measures include bird perches, sex pheromone traps, and neem-based insecticides. Disease control involves selecting healthy seeds and using wilt-resistant varieties. Harvesting is done by hand, drying the pods, and mixing dried neem leaves with seeds. Indian bean yields 700 to 800 kg per hectare, while irrigation yields 1500 kg per hectare.


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1. What is the yield of Indian bean?

Ans.: Non-irrigated Indian Ben yield 700 to 800 kg per hectare while irrigated 1500 kg per hectare.

2. In which season beans is grown in India?

Ans.: Sowing of Indian bean should be done especially in late October or the first week of November. Sowing at a distance of 60 cm. X 30 cm or 60 cm X 15 cm, so that the number of plants per hectare is sufficiently maintained.

3. What is the profit of bean farming?

Ans.: Approximately Rs.95000 per acre and Rs.237500 per hectare.

4. Which state is the largest producer of beans in India?

Ans.: Gujarat, accounted for approximately 30%.

5. How many kg of beans seed is required for one hectare sowing?

Ans.: 60 kg of seeds are per hectare, if you want to sow Indian Beans as a single crop and 25 kg of seeds per hectare, if you want to take it with mixed crops like Castor, Mustard, jute, and chickpea etc.

6. Who brought beans to India?

Ans.: French

7. What is the spacing for beans?

Ans.: Sowing at a distance of 60 cm. X 30 cm or 60 cm X 15 cm, so that the number of plants per hectare is sufficiently maintained.

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